The heavily damaged firetruck of Ladder Company 3 sits in the Museum. This close-up view shows the bright red vehicle’s twisted ladder and broken compartment doors.

FDNY Ladder 3 firetruck recovered from the World Trade Center site after September 11, 2001. Collection 9/11 Memorial Museum, Courtesy of the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. Learn more at Inside the Collection.

Photo by Dan Winters

The Collection

The 9/11 Memorial Museum’s permanent collection is an unparalleled repository consisting of material evidence, first-person testimony, and historical records of response to February 26, 1993 and September 11, 2001 and the ongoing repercussions of these terrorist events. To date, the Museum has acquired more than 70,000 artifacts that document the fate of victims, survivors, and responders.

Several damaged items belonging to Port Authority Police Officer Sharon Miller are displayed on a white backdrop with a tag marking them as evidence. The items include a misshapen police cap and a damaged copper badge.
Photo by Matt Flynn

Collection 9/11 Memorial Museum, Gift of Retired Port Authority of NY&NJ Police Officer Sharon A. Miller. Learn more at Inside the Collection.

Inside the Collection

To learn more about the scope of the Museum’s permanent collection, please visit Inside the Collection, an online catalog with a searchable database of select objects. The database is continually growing to bring more of the Museum’s rich holdings to a wider audience.

A damaged and stained red wallet is open on a gray surface. The wallet is empty. Its left corner is burned and ripped.
Photo by Michael Hnatov

Collection 9/11 Memorial Museum, Gift of Anthony and Maryann Gambale, in Memory of Giovanna Gambale. Learn more at Inside the Collection

Give to the Collection

The Museum is actively accepting donations to the permanent collection. If you have objects, documents, or images of a historical or commemorative nature, or a story to share that you believe might be of prospective interest to the Museum, please tell us about them by using the link below. 

At a table in a dimly lit room, a woman with her hands on her lap sits across from a man with a pencil and paper. There is a lamp on the table and microphones are positioned in front of the man and woman.
Photo by Jin S. Lee

Oral Histories

The 9/11 Memorial Museum’s oral history archive tells the story of 9/11 through recorded interviews conducted from different perspectives, offering the immediacy of first-person testimony of lived experiences.

Mission to Remember: Conserving Objects

Conservators at the 9/11 Memorial Museum have a unique responsibility to preserve objects that have been significantly damaged and whose meaning is often found in the damage itself. Learn more as a conservator discusses the special challenge of working with diverse materials—fine art, textiles, handwritten notes, monumental emergency vehicles, World Trade Center steel—that together tell the story of 9/11.

Video: Mission to Remember Series: Conserving Objects

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